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Good morning. This Monday, our Nation will mark the 5th anniversary of the attacks of September the 11th, 2001. On this solemn occasion, Americans will observe a day of prayer and remembrance, and Laura and I will travel to New York City, Pennsylvania, and the Pentagon to take part in memorial ceremonies. Our Nation honors the memory of every person we lost on that day of terror, and we pray that the Almighty will continue to comfort the families who had so much taken away from them.On this anniversary, we also remember the brutality of the enemy who struck our country and renew our resolve to defeat this enemy and secure a future of peace and freedom.So this week I've given a series of speeches about the nature of our enemy, the stakes of the struggle, and the progress we have made during the past five years. On Tuesday in Washington, I described in the terrorists own words what they believe, what they hope to accomplish, and how they intend to accomplish it. We know what the terrorists intend, because they have told us. They hope to establish a totalitarian Islamic empire across the Middle East, which they call a Caliphate, where all would be ruled according to their hateful ideology.Osama bin Laden has called the 9/11 attacks, "A great step towards the unity of Muslims and establishing the righteous [Caliphate]." Al Qaeda and its allies reject any possibility of coexistence with those they call "infidels." Hear the words of Osama bin Laden: "Death is better than living on this earth with the unbelievers amongst us." We must take the words of these extremists seriously, and we must act decisively to stop them from achieving their evil aims.On Wednesday at the White House, I described for the first time a CIA program we established after 9/11 to detain and question key terrorist leaders and operatives, so we can prevent new terrorist attacks. This program has been invaluable to the security of America and its allies, and helped us identify and capture men who our intelligence community believes were key architects of the September the 11th attacks.Information from terrorists held by the CIA also helped us uncover an al Qaeda cell's efforts to obtain biological weapons, identify individuals sent by al Qaeda to case targets for attacks in the ed States, stop the planned strike on a U.S. Marine base in Djibouti, prevent an attack on the U.S. consulate in Karachi, and help break up a plot to hijack passenger planes and fly them into Heathrow Airport or the Canary Wharf in London.Information from the terrorists in CIA custody has also played a role in the capture or questioning of nearly every senior al Qaeda member or associate detained by the U.S. and its allies since this program began. Were it not for this program, our intelligence community believes that al Qaeda and its allies would have succeeded in launching another attack against the American homeland. We have largely completed our questioning of these men, and now it is time that they are tried for their crimes.So this week I announced that the men we believe orchestrated the 9/11 attacks had been transferred to Guantanamo Bay. And I called on Congress to pass legislation creating military commissions to try suspected terrorists for war crimes. As soon as Congress acts to authorize these military commissions, we will prosecute these men and send a clear message to those who kill Americans: No matter how long it takes, we will find you and bring you to justice.As we bring terrorists to justice, we're acting to secure the homeland. On Thursday in Atlanta, I delivered a progress report on the steps we have taken since 9/11 to protect the American people and win the war on terror. We are safer today because we've acted to address the gaps in security, intelligence, and information sharing that the terrorists exploited in the 9/11 attacks. No one can say for sure that we would have prevented the attacks had these reforms been in place in 2001 -- yet, we can say that terrorists would have found it harder to plan and finance their operations, harder to slip into our country undetected, and harder to board the planes, take control of the cockpits, and succeed in striking their targets.America still faces determined enemies. And in the long run, defeating these enemies requires more than improved security at home and military action abroad. We must also offer a hopeful alternative to the terrorists' hateful ideology. So America is taking the side of democratic leaders and reformers and supporting the voices of tolerance and moderation across the Middle East. By advancing freedom and democracy as the great alternative to repression and radicalism, and by supporting young democracies like Iraq, we are helping to bring a brighter future to this region -- and that will make America and the world more secure.The war on terror will be long and difficult, and more tough days lie ahead. Yet, we can have confidence in the final outcome, because we know what America can achieve when our Nation acts with resolve and clear purpose. With vigilance, determination and courage, we will defeat the enemies of freedom, and we will leave behind a more peaceful world for our children and our grandchildren.Thank you for listening. 200703/10704

Happy Thanksgiving! Given the holiday, we are releasing the President's weekly address today. In this , President Obama calls to our attention the men and women in uniform who are away from home sacrificing time with family to protect our safety and freedom. He also talks about the progress of health care reform, the Recovery Act, and job creation to ensure that next Thanksgiving will be a brighter day.Download Video: mp4 (115MB) | mp3 (4MB) 11/90387

HER MAJESTY the queen has asked me to form a new government and I have accepted。  女王陛下已经授权予我组建新政府,我已接受了这一任命。  Before I talk about that new government, let me say something about the one that has just passed. Compared with a decade ago, this country is more open at home and more compassionate abroad, and that is something we should all be grateful for。  在谈论新政府之前,请允许我谈一谈最近刚刚发生过的一件事情。与十年前相比,这个国家对内更加开放,对外更加富有同情心,我们都应该为此感到高兴。  On behalf of the whole country I’d like to pay tribute to the outgoing prime minister, for his long record of dedicated public service。  我谨代表这个国家,对长期致力于公共务的前任首相深表赞扬。  In terms of the future, our country has a hung parliament where no party has an overall majority and we have some deep and pressing problems – a huge deficit, deep social problems and a political system in need of reform。  就未来而言,我们的议会无任何党派占明显多数,我们面临着一些深刻而紧迫的问题庞大的赤字、深刻的社会问题以及需要改革政治制度。  For those reasons, I aim to form a proper and full coalition between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats. I believe that is the right way to provide this country with the strong, the stable, the good and decent government that I think we need so badly。  基于这些原因,我计划在保守党和自由民主党间组建适当并充分的联盟。我想,这是为国家提供一个我认为我们非常需要的强大、稳定、完善、体面的政府的正确途径。  Nick Clegg and I are both political leaders who want to put aside party differences and work hard for the common good and for the national interest. I believe that is the best way to get the strong government that we need, decisive government that we need today。  尼克·克莱格(Nick Clegg)和我都是希望撇开党派差异、为公益事业、为国家利益而努力的领导人。我认为,这是打造我们所需要的强大政府的最佳途径,是打造今天我们需要的果断的政府的最佳途径。201109/152203

dvE2VmdR;eNOM)mvG3m4o6I know in my heart that Walter Mondale will be that President.A wise man once said, ;Every one of us is given the gift of life, and what a strange gift it is. If it is preserved jealously and selfishly, it impoverishes and saddens. But if it is spent for others, it enriches and beautifies.; My fellow Americans: We can debate policies and programs, but in the end what separates the two parties in this election campaign is whether we use the gift of life for others or only ourselves.Tonight, my husband, John, and our three children are in this hall with me. To my daughters, Donna and Laura, and my son, John Junior, I say: My mother did not break faith with me, and I will not break faith with you.To all the children of America, I say: The generation before ours kept faith with us, and like them, we will pass on to you a stronger, more just America.Thank you.N0Nj,snr,4i)5W.i0@;zV-p@GGLP++Ar^aRd[-P;c0)!*)TjlFvSDn%)- 201201/168817

Friday 12 May - Strategic Direction of Government You may have heard me and my colleagues talking over the last few days about the need to keep focussed on the long-term - warning of the need not to get blown about by day to day events. In Government there will always be up and downs and I'm sure there will be plenty more. The downs, in particular, make up the daily headlines in the news. But what's important is to stay focussed on what really matters, on the fundamentals - on economy and jobs, welfare reform, on health, education, crime and transport. On long-term change necessary to deliver opportunity and security for the many, not the few. I'm the first to admit we have got a great deal more to do. But by concentrating on these fundamentals, I believe we've been able to make more progress than anyone would have thought possible two or three years ago. The overall goal is clear. It's to build a Britain that is strong modern, and fair. It's an ambitious task. Of course will take time. And it can't be done without change, without hard choices, keeping our eye firmly on the long-term. Because unless something works for the long term, it doesn't really work at all. Tough decisions like giving the Bank of England independence or keeping a tight control of public spending in our first two years which meant saying no as well as yes to a lot of spending plans made to us. But the result today is a Britain with a strong economy where inflation is lower for longer than for decades, public borrowing has been cut by pound;40 billion and as a result of the stability of the economy, nearly 900,000 more people in work than three years ago. Tough decisions like making work pay ensuring we offer more than just a benefit cheque to those out of work. So we have brought in the minimum wage, the Working Families Tax Credit and the New Deal which has helped cut youth unemployment aly by 70%. Tough decisions on pensioners as well. And I know that many people are angry at what they say is simply the 75p rise in the basic state pension. And of course we could have taken the opportunity to put all the money into the basic state pension and win some short-term popularity. But it would have been the wrong decision. Because had we given the pension rise across the board the same for everyone, no matter what they had been given it would have gone exactly the same way to better off and poorer pensioners alike. But the poorest pensioners would hardly have seen a penny of this because their other benefits would have gone down as their basic state pension rose. So what we've done and done deliberately, is to target help first on those poorest pensioners in a way which delivers the most help to those who need it most. So for example the pound;150 winter allowance and the free TV licences for those aged over 75. They have been introduced in a way which means they're not affected by other benefits that people have. And for those above the benefit levels, there's an increase in capital limits and the 10p tax rate. And of course for the very poorest pensioners the new minimum income guarantee means that for a million pensioners, those who are the very poorest pensioners they will get income rises and have got income rises of in some cases up to pound;15 or pound;20 a week. The package together adds up to pound;6.5 billion - that is more than if we uprated the basic pension in line with earnings. So we made some tough choices but we made them from the right values - fairness, helping those that need it most. We have made tough choices too on Education. We need far more investment in education, and we're doing it. An extra investment of an extra pound;300 per pupil over the three years up to 2001. But it's investment tied to reform. Reform of course hasn't always been popular. There was opposition to the literacy and numeracy hour, for example. There's opposition now to reforming pay so teachers can earn extra money without having to leave the classroom for management roles in schools. But as a result of these reforms we are seeing standards improve. The eleven year olds' results for literacy and numeracy were the best ever. The new specialist schools are raising their results quicker than any other schools in the country. So we've taken the long-term view, we've made our reforms and we're going to stick to our guns with them. And it's the same on the health service. We've had to put in place the right strategy for the long-term heath of the National Health Service - backed by the biggest ever sustained increase in funding the Health Service has seen. Not just for one year as used to happen in the past, but now for the next four years we know that the Health Service is going to get the money that we need. And this aly means that we are getting more doctors and nurses into our hospitals. More are now being trained. There are thirty eight new hospitals being built in England alone. Over the next few weeks, we are going to be drawing up the plan to ensure that every penny of the extra investment goes to the Health Service in a way that really brings about a decent improvement in health care. And this plan, the first of it's kind, is not just about spending money, but allying it with change and reform and will I believe deliver a step change in patient care to match our step change in investment and resources. So I know, of course, there are frustrations at the speed of progress, at how much hasn't been done for years, over how much remains to be done. But in fact an immense amount has been done aly, it's just we have a lot more to do. But I've not come across many people who say we are wrong in what we are doing, or disagree with the big decisions we've made or believe we are taking the country in the wrong direction. They agree with us on the destination, they simply want us to get there faster. And so do I. But to get there faster means doing it for the long term. For there's no use doing it fast if it can't be sustained. So on Monday. Gordon Brown will set out how we meet the goal of abolishing child poverty in 20 years. By the end of this month aly one million children will have been lifted out of poverty. On Tuesday at the Confederation for British Industry, I'll set out how we will meet the goal of delivering stability and prosperity for people in a world of rapid economic and technological change. On Wednesday at the Police Federation conference, Jack Straw, the Home Secretary will set out how we take forward the next phase of our programme to tackle crime. So we're going to keep concentrating on what needs to be done to strengthen our economy and our society to deliver opportunity and security for all. Britain's always worked well for the top ten per cent. Our task is and remains to make the changes necessary to make it work for all our people. 200705/13319


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